Remembering Dec 6- Operation oyster and Sinterklaas bombing

ROYAL AIR FORCE BOMBER COMMAND, 1942-1945. (C 5755) Operation OYSTER, the daylight attack on the Philips radio and valve works at Eindhoven, Holland, by No. 2 Group. Douglas Bostons fly over the burning Emmasingel lamp and valve factory at the height of the raid. Wikipedia
This year it will be 80 years since the Sinterklaas bombardment in Eindhoven took place. Code named ‘Operation Oyster’, the British Air Force bombed Philips factories in Eindhoven on December 6, 1942.

The motive was to destroy the production of lamps and radio parts for the German occupiers. Sadly the bombing killed 149 civilians, 16 British and 7 German soldiers and injured many. As fate would have it, there was a huge collateral damage.

Many children excited to visit their grandparents, and other family members in expectation of a gift witnessed the horror of these bombings. The Philips tower in Emmasingel was still standing, and the factories resumed work within six weeks after the bombings, but a lot had changed in Eindhoven and for the Eindhovenaars.The British bombing was part of a strategic plan, but the citizens of Eindhoven became the victims.

In memory of the fateful day in 1942, a memorial service will be held at that monument on Tuesday, December 6. Indeed, this is open to the public and starts at 2.15 pm. The Oyster monument is located on the Mathildelaan.

The Philips Museum offers a free guided tour of the monument every day from 7 to 11 December at 2:30 PM. You can register via info-museum@philips.com. There is room for 20 people per tour. In the same period, photos of the destruction of the Philips buildings are displayed on the museum’s facade.

A life-changing war story of a six-year-old boy who witnessed the Sinterklaas bombing is penned by Laurie Wolffs on Brabant remembers.

For Eindhoven News:Beena Arunraj

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